Share The Love – Valentine’s Inspiration

Share The Love – Valentine’s Inspiration

Be inspired by Artisan created Valentine’s Jewelry and Component designs.

If you find something you like, you can click on the image to go to their Instagram page and comment or review their profile for more info or many will be adding their info in the comments below.  Also, you can share an image to your favorite social site by hovering over the picture: Dk Blue = Facebook, Lt Blue = Twitter and Red = Pinterest.


If interested in adding your work, please scroll to the bottom for the details!  Enjoy!

  • bandanagirl silverjewelry heartjewelry moonstone A sweet new design! cbcvd
  • AztecaDesignsBoutique hearts hoops argentiumsilver simplyher forher giftideas giftwrapped sweetheart valentinehellip
  • Amber and Dumorterite Sterling Bracelet httpwwwomisilveretsycom cbcvd valentines handmade
  • Unexpected Heart Donut  bobbiejwilsoncomproductunexpectedheartdonut handmade fusedglass cbcvd
  • Sweet heart earrings  bohostyle bohemian handcrafted handmadeatamazon bandanagirl heartearringshellip
  • Sweethearts Forever! Fabricated from copper sheet Argentium wire and lotshellip
  • First wave of Heart pairs 30 to start will behellip
  • Pretty pink and ivory pearl memory wire bracelet with pinkhellip
Want your Valentine’s items included??  

Excited to share our first INSTAGRAM #hashtag slide show.  If you have a relevant Valentine’s component or jewelry design you would like to be included follow these directions:

  • Go to your INSTAGRAM App and click the Camera Icon
  • Upload a “Valentine’s relevent component, jewelry design or collage. Could be a selfie shot of you or another wearing your design too.  (Remember Instagram uses a “square image”)
  • In the “Add a Caption” Add a description, business name, website link (while it won’t be a live URL, folks can copy and paste to find you)  add any #hashtags you want, but you
  • MUST*** add our CBC # to be auto included in our slideshow.  #cbcvd
  • Click OK…then SHARE.
  • You may also edit a previous Instagram post to add the #cbcvd
  • Check back in an hour to see your product shine!
  • Please limit to maximum of 15 images
  • In comments below: You may add your Instagram Name, Business Name, Website URL  and any other pertinent info you want include.  Please create one Comment for all info.  This way folks can find you easier! Comments must be approved so you may not see them until someone has time to do so.

We hope you’ll share our page with all your friends to inspire them for Valentine’s…It’s all about the love!  Let’s share each others beautiful jewelry and component designs.  Just maybe we’ll all get a little love and find some great new Artisans to connect with! Any ideas for other Instagram feeds?  It’s a great tool and seen by a huge audience!  Let’s build our businesses!

How To Price Your Jewelry Like a Pro

How To Price Your Jewelry Like a Pro

Pricing my handmade jewelry is one area that I seem to take light consideration to.  For many years, I have been practicing new techniques until last fall, I finally committed to taking the leap and work towards a unified jewelry line with hopes to offer wholesale products as well as a bigger platform for my jewelry line.  I’m also continuing my component and supply line on Etsy, which has been my mainstay for these past few learning years.

I’ve come across a few great blog posts that are perfect to reference and build your own calculator that fits your products.

Patina Designs

Silver Designs

Gold Designs

Leather Designs

Read the full article from Launch Grow Joy

How to price your products – handmade, Etsy and beyond

This is the simplest formula you can use:

(Labor + Materials) x 2 = Wholesale price

The x2 takes into account your profit and overhead as well, so you’re covered. As far as what your labor costs should be, think about how much you want to pay yourself per hour or how much you would pay someone per hour to make your products and divide that number by how many products you think you can make per hour. If an hourly wage is not what you want to measure, then think about how much salary would want to pay yourself per month (or per year) and use that number instead of the hourly rate.

If you plan on selling your products to other retail stores, you’ll have to take that into account. Your retailers will usually mark up your wholesale price at least 2 times.

To set your retail price, use this formula:

Wholesale Price x 2 = Retail Price (or MSRP)

So if each set of earrings you make costs you $2 in materials, and you pay yourself $15 for the half hour it takes to make them, then your wholesale price is $34 and your retail price is $68. To figure how you should price your products, download the free pricing worksheet below – simply plug in your own numbers and you’ll have a range of pricing to start with. Please keep in mind that if you plan on working with sales reps or distributors, you will want to factor that in to your pricing.

Andrea from Launch Grow Joy, also offers a downloadable calculator on her blog and offers many business building articles as well as seminars that I’ve attended.

 


Read the entire "How do I price my handmade goods" by Create and Thrive, article here: 

Jess Van Denn of Create and Thrive, offers some terrific insight and steps to implement this pricing. She offers the same calculation as above. 

Cost Price (labour + price of materials) x 2 = Wholesale

Wholesale x 2 = Retail

Now, if you want to make a profit – which is the amount you have to grow and re-invest in your business – you should double this amount for Retail, which equals $60. (By the way, the retail price is what you should be selling for online, and at markets.)

Sounds like a lot, hey?

But, in professional handmade business circles, this is standard practice. It is difficult for those of us who do this as a hobby to look at it like this sometimes – and when you’re competing with people who sell at a price that doesn’t even begin to come near their true costs, you might feel like you’re being greedy.

Remember – hobbyists aren’t trying to make a living out of selling their craft – they’re just trying to cover materials costs and maybe get a little extra on the side. That is how they can afford to charge so little – their livelihood is not relying on this money!

Also – if you’re selling internationally – and especially if you’re selling in another currency in some places (for example, I still sell in USD on Etsy because I’ve found through experimentation that listing prices in AUD puts off my American customers from buying, but it doesn’t bother Aussies to buy in USD) you need to take exchange rates/paypal fees/paypal currency conversion fees etc into account.

For those of you who want to do a super-serious, completely in-depth calculation to work out your prices, check out this excellent article by Australian Jeweller Simone Walsh.

When you graduate from a hobbyist to a business, you’re going to need to re-think your pricing. Starting with a simple formula like the one above is an excellent start… but it’s not the end of the story. Once you know mathematically what you should be pricing, you need to turn around and look at your price from another perspective.

2. Price with the Heart

There’s more to price than the basic in and out formula. Why do you think Apple has such a huge profit margin compared to other tech companies?

It ain’t because their materials and labour costs are way lower. No, it’s because they’ve built a brand that enables them to charge twice as much for pretty much the exact same technology as their competitor – and their customers are not only happy to pay, they’re ravenous, raving fans, just dying to drop another wad of $$ on the new model eye-phone, even when their ‘old’ one works just fine, thank you very much!

That, my friends, is the power of branding, and that is where pricing with the heart comes in.

Someone who outlines this very issue excellently is my friend Megan Auman. She actually wrote a new post on this recently – but she’s been writing and talking about this issue for a long time now.

You need to start looking at your brand from the outside – through the eyes of your customer. Visit your shop and pretend you have never been there before. That it’s just a shop you’ve stumbled upon while browsing Etsy. Even better, pretend you’ve stumbled across your band on a stand-alone website, or in a retail store! (Etsy can sometimes have the issue of making people expect artificially low prices.)

What does it say to you?

  • Does it say ‘professional artisan’?
  • Does it say ‘high-quality craftsmanship’?
  • Does it say ‘unique, exclusive design’?
  • Does your brand scream ‘cheap’ or does it scream ’boutique’?

I want you to be intentionally blind to the prices – blind to the fact that you make these things. I want you to pretend you’ve never made one of your whatevers, and that you don’t have the skill or the inclination to make it.

What would you expect to pay for it? What would you be willing to pay for it?

Take this to another level. Are you even your target customer? Because hey, maybe your target customer is someone who is willing to pay WAY more for your whatever than you would. What might someone really be willing to pay for your wares?

A good way to research this is to show your product to friends or family. Especially those who are a little bit removed from what you make. Ask them – ‘if you saw this in a shop, what would you expect to pay for it’? You might be surprised.

I’d like to let you in on a little secret.

I actually raised my prices 2 times last year. The first was a small, 10% rise in April. The second was a much more dramatic rise in September (and honestly, I have to thank Megan’s talk at the Artful Biz Con for finally giving me the push I needed to take that step).

For example: at this time last year, I was selling this pair of sterling silver earrings for $22 ($22!! I seriously can’t believe that figure now – SO low!). Then it was $25. Now it is $35, and I’m much more comfortable that I’m on the right track with my pricing. Megan would probably tell me off – tell me I should be charging about $60 retail for them – but I’m not quite there yet! Like I said at the beginning, you’re never ‘done’ with pricing.

In the first 2 months of 2013, I sold around the same volume of jewellery on Etsy as I did this same time last year. (I sold a lot more overall this year because the business on my own website is much, much higher now). However, guess what? My revenue – the money I earnt – from those same volume of sales? It’s DOUBLE what I earnt last year. Therein lies the power in raising your prices to what you and your work is worth.

Not only that? I am much more comfortable with my prices now. I am a professional artisan. This is my livelihood. I have years of skill and practice. I make an excellent, quality product.And my prices reflect that.

Do yours?

Homework:

  1. Visit your shop and do the above ‘I am a stranger’ exercise. I’d love for you to come back here and share your findings!
  2. Take just ONE of your products and work out a price using the formula I gave you above. It is very basic, but it’s a good start. Share with us what you discover – are you pricing way too low?

 

Read the entire article Professional pricing for craft and design, By Simone Walsh here: 

Calculating wages:

Your business should pay you a realistic wage for the amount of time you spend working in it, including covering income tax and other costs.

If this makes you feel uncomfortable, think about how much you would need to pay someone else to do the work that you do. Also think about how much you’d want to be paid if you were employed doing the same work you do in your business.

You are just as entitled to earn a living wage from what you do as anyone – even if you love what you do! Read more about what it means to truly support indie designers.

Calculating non-chargeable wages:

Most makers at least know to incorporate a labour rate into their pricing for the items they make to sell. However, wages shouldn’t end there.

Consider the time you spend in your business over the course of a year which is not chargeable as part of creating an item. This might include time spent photographing, marketing, doing admin work, researching, sourcing materials, packing and posting orders, etc..

Start by estimating the number of hours per week or per month you think are needed for this type of work. Then determine an appropriate hourly rate for this work – what would you need to pay someone else to do it for you?

Then calculate the time and hourly rate into an annual figure based on the number of weeks you operate your business each year. As an example:

  • 10 hours per week x $20 per hour = $200
  • $200 x 48 weeks = $9600 per annum

Set this annual ‘non-chargeable wage’ figure aside for now. It should be included in your overheads calculation as part of your breakeven analysis (see below).

Calculating chargeable wages:

Your chargeable wage is the income generated by the labour rate included in the price of each each item you make to sell.

Every piece you make should have your labour factored into it. It doesn’t have to be timed down to the last second – I make an educated guess as to what a piece will take me to finish on average once I have it in production.

To help work out what your labour rate should be, a great place to start is to calculate the annual personal income (on top of the above non-chargeable figure) you need or would like to be earning from your business.

Then determine how many weeks a year you will work in your business (allowing time for holidays, illness, etc – 48 weeks works for me).

Finally, estimate how many hours a week you expect to work on making items which you will then sell. Remember to allow time for all of those other business-related things you need to do – and don’t forget you need to have a life, as well!

Divide the annual amount you wish to earn from your labour by the number of weeks you intend to work per year. Then divide that figure by the number of hours per week you estimate you’ll spend actually making work to sell to get your hourly rate.

As a fairly outrageous example, let’s pretend you want to make $500,000 a year in wages and you only intend to work 5 hours a week making what you sell:

  • $500,000 divided by 48 weeks = $10,416 a week
  • $10,416 divided by 5 = $2083 (that’s your hourly labour rate!)

If whatever your hourly figure works out to be looks unreasonably low or high, then take a step back to the big picture and reassess. Keep doing this until you have a figure you’re happy with.

Of course you can always adjust this figure at any point: this is just a method to help you come up with a realistic amount, based on your own life along with your economy (almost every country will be different as to what an appropriate labour rate looks like).

Use your final hourly rate figure to calculate costs for your time for everything you make and include it in your spreadsheet or whatever method you are using to add up your direct cost of sales (such as materials and processes for each piece).

Note that this chargeable wage figure does not get added to your overheads (see below).

Breakeven analysis:

A major step towards professional pricing is to do a ‘breakeven analysis’ for your business. This will give you a big picture view as to the margins you need to add to your work in order to make ends meet – and hopefully make a profit too.

The one thing that so many design/craft pricing methods forget is that your business must cover all of its costs – not just materials and labour. Every tool you use, every advertisement you pay for, every business card you have printed, etc. must ultimately be covered by your business turnover.

Even if your business isn’t doing this as you get established, you need to aim for this to happen in the longer term. To do this you need to know what these costs are and how they at least should be impacting upon your pricing.

There’s much more to complete Simon’s overview.  I’ve just pulled the highlight from his post, please visit the link above to read.

Following the advice from these professionals, will push our hobby businesses into professional businesses.  I believe this is a hard concept to get your head around but, but once we leave our hobby diapers and put on our professional pullups, we will never look back.

I would love for you to link your favorite business strategy posts, comments of what’s worked for you or even questions you may have and I’ll do my best to answer.  Please understand I am still wearing diapers at night…but I’m getting better every day! Haha

How about you?

USPS Announces New Shipping Rates

USPS Announces New Shipping Rates

Rate Increase Highlights

  • The average shipping price rises 9.5% from $5.02 to $5.50.
  • Priority Mail rises an average of 9.8%.
  • Priority Mail Express rises an average of 15.6%.
  • The USPS discontinues Priority Mail Express Flat Rate boxes.
  • First-Class Package Service rises an average of 12.8%. But there is good news after January 17: The maximum weight for First-Class Package increases from 12.99 oz to 15.99 oz. Also, the rate for First-Class Packages under 8 oz. is a flat $2.60, which simplifies lightweight package pricing.
  • Standard Post is now called Retail Ground, with an average increase of 10%.
  • The USPS Click ‘n Ship online label printing service will no longer use Commercial Base Pricing discount.

 

january-2016-rate-change-article---lead-graphic

Effective January 17, 2016, USPS shipping rates increase an average of 9.5%. The January increase does not impact letters, First-Class flats and cards.

Even though shipping rates are rising, the USPS remains a cheap, reliable option for many package mailing scenarios.

FP Mailing Solutions Customers

FP customers may need to take action to update their equipment and/or software to the new rates. For instructions, go to the FP Rates Update Center.

Read on to see what’s changing and how you can cut more mail costs.

Rate Increase Highlights

  • The average shipping price rises 9.5% from $5.02 to $5.50.
  • Priority Mail rises an average of 9.8%.
  • Priority Mail Express rises an average of 15.6%.
  • The USPS discontinues Priority Mail Express Flat Rate boxes.
  • First-Class Package Service rises an average of 12.8%. But there is good news after January 17: The maximum weight for First-Class Package increases from 12.99 oz to 15.99 oz. Also, the rate for First-Class Packages under 8 oz. is a flat $2.60, which simplifies lightweight package pricing.
  • Standard Post is now called Retail Ground, with an average increase of 10%.
  • The USPS Click ‘n Ship online label printing service will no longer use Commercial Base Pricing discount.

Download & Print:
Shipping Rates Increase Infographic:

january-2016-rate-change-infographic

January 2016 Postage Rate Increase (Infographic)

Shipping Rate Average Increases At-a-Glance

Shipping Service INCREASE
Overall
INCREASE
Retail
INCREASE
Commercial Base Pricing (CBP)
New CBP Discount
Priority Mail 9.8% 8.6% 9.4% 13.9%
Priority Mail Express 15.6% 14.4% 17.7% 10.0%
First-Class Package 12.8% N/A N/A N/A
Parcel Select Ground (formerly Select Nonpresort) 3.1% N/A N/A N/A
Retail Ground (formerly Standard Post) 10% 10% N/A N/A

Eliminated Services

The USPS eliminated the following products for the January 2016 rate change:

Commercial Base Pricing (CBP) on USPS Click ‘n Ship (Print & Ship) Online Service
Until January 17, 2016, anyone with internet access could log into usps.com and buy a 4”x6” label at the Commercial Base Pricing discount. After this rate change, the USPS online service charges higher retail rates. To get CBP discounted rates, you need a postage meter or online postage service.

First-Class Package—Commercial Plus Pricing
Commercial Plus Pricing (bulk package price discount) for First-Class Package Service (FCPS) is going away, leaving mailers with Commercial Base Pricing (single-piece price discount) for FCPS.

Regional Rate Box C for Priority Mail and Priority Mail International
This large box (up to 25 lbs) had flat rate pricing, depending on origin & destination (zones). Regional Rate Boxes A (15 lbs) and B (20 lbs) remain.

Flat Rate Box for Priority Mail Express and Priority Mail International Express
After January 17, 2016, mailers will price Priority Mail Express by weight & zone.

Critical Mail
Critical Mail was a service for high-volume mailers that offered tracking and more security for important documents. Commercial Plus Flat Rate Envelopes and Signature Confirmation services replace Critical Mail.

Adapting to the New Rates

Here’s what you can do to adjust your business shipping practices to the new rates:

  • Consider flat rate envelopes and boxes. With the new price structures, flat rate will more often cost less than your own packaging.
  • Consider USPS more often for packages under five pounds.
  • Run some calculations at the USPS Postage Calculator for your typical shipping practices. You may find less expensive alternatives that will save your business a lot of money.
  • Get on the Commercial Base Pricing (CBP) bandwagon. As of January 17, CBP is no longer on the USPS Print ‘n Ship website. Plus, all USPS package shipments must be IMPB (Intelligent Mail Package Barcode) compliant. To get IMPB barcodes, you could go to the local post office and pay higher retail rates. Why not use a postage meter or online postage service to get Commercial Base Pricing?
  • For lightweight packages, consider shifting to First-Class Package Service. It’s a flat $2.60 for packages under 9 ounces.

First Class Package Service Rates

Typically 1-3 Days Delivery, includes tracking

Prices are for lightweight single-piece (up to 15.99 oz) commercial rates, which requires a postage meter or online postage service.

**Don’t confuse this with First Class Retail Parcels, which is intended for residential or one-off shipping of lightweight (up to 13 oz) through the local post office. First Class Retail Parcel service is part of the Dominant (non-competitive) mail classes and is not part of the January 17 rate change.

Weight (up to) Before Jan. 17 After Jan. 17 Price Increase Percent Increase
0.99 oz $2.04 $2.60 $0.56 27.5%
1.99 oz $2.04 $2.60 $0.56 27.5%
2.99 oz $2.04 $2.60 $0.56 27.5%
3.99 oz $2.13 $2.60 $0.47 22.1%
4.99 oz $2.22 $2.60 $0.38 17.1%
5.99 oz $2.35 $2.60 $0.25 10.6%
6.99 oz $2.53 $2.60 $0.07 2.8%
7.99 oz $2.71 $2.60 -$0.11 -4.1%
8.99 oz $2.89 $3.30 $0.41 14.2%
9.99 oz $3.07 $3.35 $0.28 9.1%
10.99 oz $3.25 $3.40 $0.15 4.6%
11.99 oz $3.44 $3.45 $0.01 0.3%
12.99 oz $3.63 $3.50 -$0.13 -3.6%
13.99 oz Varies $3.55 N/A N/A
14.99 oz Varies $3.60 N/A N/A
15.99 oz Varies $3.65 N/A N/A

Priority Mail Rates

1-3 Days Delivery, includes tracking

Priority Mail Commercial Base Pricing
Your Packaging (5lb Package)
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
3
ZONE
4
ZONE
5
ZONE
6
ZONE
7
ZONE
8
ZONE
9
Before Jan. 17 $6.78 $7.33 $8.42 $11.26 $15.22 $16.58 $18.87 $22.64
After Jan. 17 $7.39 $7.99 $9.01 $11.26 $15.22 $17.41 $19.81 $28.30
Price Increase $0.61 $0.66 $0.59 $0.00 $0.00 $0.83 $0.94 $5.66
Percent Increase 9.0% 9.0% 7.0% 0.0% 0.0% 5.0% 5.0% 25.0%

 

Priority Mail Retail Pricing
Your Packaging (5lb Package)
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
Before Jan. 17 $8.95 $9.95 $11.30 $16.20 $17.80 $19.20 $21.55 $25.20
After Jan. 17 $9.85 $10.95 $12.45 $17.00 $18.70 $20.65 $23.15 $30.25
Price Increase $0.90 $1.00 $1.15 $0.80 $0.90 $1.45 $1.60 $5.05
Percent Increase 10.1% 10.1% 10.2% 4.9% 5.1% 7.6% 7.4% 20.0%

 

Priority Mail Commercial Base Pricing
Flat Rate
Envelope Legal Envelope Padded Envelope Small Box Medium Box Large Box
Before Jan. 17 $5.05 $5.25 $5.70 $5.25 $11.30 $15.80
After Jan. 17 $5.75 $5.75 $6.10 $6.10 $11.95 $16.35
Price Increase $0.70 $0.50 $0.40 $0.85 $0.65 $0.55
Percent Increase 13.9% 9.5% 7.0% 16.2% 5.8% 3.5%

 

Priority Mail Retail Pricing
Flat Rate
Envelope Legal Envelope Padded Envelope Small Box Medium Box Large Box
Before Jan. 17 $5.75 $5.90 $6.10 $5.95 $12.65 $17.90
After Jan. 17 $6.45 $6.45 $6.80 $6.80 $13.45 $18.75
Price Increase $0.70 $0.55 $0.70 $0.85 $0.80 $0.85
Percent Increase 12.2% 9.3% 11.5% 14.3% 6.3% 4.7%

Priority Mail Express Rates

Overnight delivery

Priority Mail Express Commercial Base Pricing
Your Packaging (1lb Package)
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
3
ZONE
4
ZONE
5
ZONE
6
ZONE
7
ZONE
8
ZONE
9
Before Jan. 17 $15.13 $17.58 $22.21 $25.21 $27.54 $29.10 $30.00 $36.60
After Jan. 17 $20.66 $21.56 $25.97 $29.07 $30.11 $31.95 $32.94 $40.19
Price Increase $5.53 $3.98 $3.76 $3.86 $2.57 $2.85 $2.94 $3.59
Percent Increase 36.5% 22.6% 16.9% 15.3% 9.3% 9.8% 9.8% 9.8%

 

Priority Mail Express Retail Pricing
Your Packaging (1lb Package)
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
ZONE
1 & 2
Before Jan. 17 $17.95 $23.95 $28.85 $32.30 $33.45 $35.50 $36.60 $44.65
After Jan. 17 $22.95 $23.95 $28.85 $32.30 $33.45 $35.50 $36.60 $44.65
Price Increase $5.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00
Percent Increase 27.9% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

 

Priority Mail Express Commercial Base Pricing
Flat Rate
Envelopes Flat Rate Boxes
Before Jan. 17 $18.11 $44.95
After Jan. 17 $20.66 Discontinued
Price Increase $2.55 N/A
Percent Increase 14.1% N/A

 

Priority Mail Express Retail Pricing
Flat Rate
Envelopes Flat Rate Boxes
Before Jan. 17 $19.99 $44.95
After Jan. 17 $22.95 Discontinued
Price Increase $2.96 N/A
Percent Increase 14.8% N/A

International Shipping

International shippers will also see an increase in postage rates starting January 17, 2016.  Below are some highlights on the upcoming rate changes for international mail classes:

Global Express Guaranteed postage rates are expected to rise by an average of 7.1%.

Priority Mail Express International postage rates will increase by an average of 11.6% next year.  Flat Rate Boxes for this international service will be discontinued in 2016.  In addition, prices for Priority Mail Express International Flat Rate Envelopes and Boxes will be further separated into additional country groups.

Priority Mail International postage rates will see an overall increase of 10.2% in 2016.  Commercial Base and Commercial Plus pricing for this service will be the same next year.

First Class Package International Service postage rates will increase by an average of 21.6% in 2016, however Commercial Base and Plus prices will remain the same next year.  The average price increases by pound are:

– Up to 1 lb. – Average Increase of $5.17
– Up to 2 lbs. – Average Increase of ($1.77)
– Up to 3 lbs. – Average Increase of $1.63
– Up to 4 lbs. – Average Increase of $11.58

First Class International: 

Title Prices
Global Express Guaranteed® From $59.95 at the Post Office™

From $56.95 for Commercial Base®

From $56.95 for Commercial Plus®

Priority Mail Express International® From $40.95 at the Post Office™

From $38.90 for Commercial Base

From $38.90 for Commercial Plus™

Priority Mail Express International Flat Rate™ Envelopes

From $41.50 at the Post Office

$39.45 for all other countries

$39.45 for all other countries

Priority Mail International® From $31.75 at the Post Office

From $30.16 for Commercial Base

From $30.16 for Commercial Plus

Priority Mail International Flat Rate™ Envelopes

From $23.95 at Post Office

From $22.75 for Commercial Base

From $22.75 for Commercial Plus

Small Flat Rate Priced Boxes

From $24.95 at Post Office

From $23.70 for Commercial Base

From $23.70 for Commercial Plus

Medium Flate Rate Priced Boxes

From $45.95 at Post Office

From $43.65 for Commercial Base

From $43.65 for Commercial Plus

Large Flat Rate Priced Boxes

From $59.95 at Post Office

From $56.95 for Commercial Base

From $56.95 for Commercial Plus

First-Class Mail International® Letters and postcards from $1.20 for all countries

Large Envelopes (Flats) from $2.38 for all countries

First-Class Package International Service® From $9.50 at the Post Office

From $9.03 for Commercial Base

From $9.03 for Commercial Plus

Airmail M-Bags™ From $44.00
International Priority Airmail® Varies
International Surface Air Lift® Varies
International Business Reply® Service From $1.35 per piece

 

For those of you printing your postage online, here is the direct link to USPS pricing for Domestic & International https://www.usps.com/business/prices.htm

 

 

Jeanne ~ Janine Lucas

Jeanne ~ Janine Lucas

 

Whenever I come across a collection of orphan beads, I can’t help myself, I just need to adopt them. So, when Michele Sayetta offered a big bag of gorgeous lampwork beads, I took the chance and bought them. And I wasn’t disappointing.
For this necklace I picked a mouth dropping beautiful bead from her collection. It has a copper/gold color with silver dots. The dots are mirrored in the wire wrapped copper/gold seed bead section. I wanted the bead to draw maximal attention so I kept the rest of the design simple with the same colors as the lampwork bead: silvery glass beads, silver plated brass beads and discs, golden/bronze seed beads and sari silk and silverplated ball chain.Esfera-jewelry-necklace-bronze-silver-2

A Quiet Crystal Winter Morn ~ Linda Anderson

A Quiet Crystal Winter Morn ~ Linda Anderson

 

 

WinterNecklace-LindaAnderson

I have lived in the cold, frozen tundra of Minnesota for most of my life.  One of the things I LOVE about it, is what happens after a fresh snow…how everything glitters and glimmers.  It’s one of the most beautiful things, in all of creation.  It’s such a unique experience to crunch down on the shimmering snow and see it change from a gorgeous, protected layer of cold – to a path that the sun will eventually work to melt.  Whenever I look at this piece, I can hear that crunching and imagine my feet punching through.  That shimmering coat of snow may only last a few hours – and then it’s gone – until next time.

Each element in this piece, adds glimmer and shimmer.  I used Swarovski crystals, czech beads, and bright silver chain.  It needed to have several strands, to balance out the size and weight of the focal.  This was the first, real artisan bead I’d ever purchased.  I’m kinda hooked, now. =)

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